The Tribune Group has a long and proud history as the voice of the centre left of the Parliamentary Labour Party. 

Labour Tribune MPs want to build on that heritage by initiating policy discussions and engaging with the wider Labour movement right across the UK.  We will work with individuals and organisations that share our values and common goals, to develop ideas that will help inform and shape future debates around a wide range of policies.

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Members

CLIVE EFFORD MP
ELTHAM
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LOUISE HAIGH MP
SHEFFIELD HEELEY
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LIZ MCINNES MP
HEYWOOD AND MIDDLETON
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LYN BROWN MP
WEST HAM
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BILL ESTERSON MP
SEFTON CENTRAL
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JO STEVENS MP
CARDIFF CENTRAL
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  • Latest from the blog

    Educating for our future

    Britain has a long way to go in order to create an education and skills system fit for the modern world. And if that was urgent before the EU referendum, now we are leaving it is critical that we prepare the foundations for a new settlement.

    As the Fabians have highlighted, globalisation, changing demographics and shifts in global demand are radically altering the nature of work. Governments must keep up with these changes. But a lack of investment in adult skills and lifelong learning by our government means that we are falling behind other developed countries.

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    Smearing benefit claimants as "scroungers" harms fight against poverty

    January is not just a time for sober reflection; it is also a time for clarity and determination, renewal and ambition. Though many resolutions fall by the wayside, others are worth keeping. I believe that in 2018 there should be a new resolve to tackle child poverty and begin to fulfil more of our nation’s potential.

    The Institute of Fiscal Studies forecasts that by 2022 there will be 5.2 million children living in poverty – nine children in every class of 30. Some 128,000 children are homeless, and a further 1.6 million are living in over-crowded, temporary, and run-down housing. These statistics are frightening and the reason for them is clear. Despite being an essential institution, the welfare state is too often seen as an unwanted burden.

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    Small towns are the key to a stronger economy and a more cohesive nation

    Subtly, in recent decades Britain has transformed. Our towns and cities have become, as the academics Will Jennings and Gerry Stoker put it, two Englands, with increasingly different views and priorities. This widening gulf was most starkly illustrated by Brexit, but the differences go much wider and cover social attitudes on issues from immigration to civil rights and political differences.

    The roots of this lie in changing demographics. As our cities have grown younger over the last 25 years, our towns and villages have grown older. Between 1981 and 2011 our towns and villages lost more than a million people under the age of 25. In contrast the core cities gained 300,000. Over the same period the number of over 65s in our towns grew by more than two million.

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    In place of fear: Labour's Jonathan Ashworth on how to solve the NHS crisis

    On the wall of Jonathan Ashworth’s office is a whiteboard itemising the woes of the National Health Service: the four million patients on waiting lists, the continually missed A&E targets, the 80,000 operations cancelled in 2017. As the 70th anniversary of the NHS’s creation approaches (5 July), Ashworth believes the service is in its worst state for two decades. “It’s not a winter crisis, it’s an all-year-round crisis,” the shadow health secretary told me when we met in parliament.

    Although the Conservatives have formally protected health spending since 2010, the NHS has still endured the longest period of austerity since its foundation. Historically, expenditure has risen by an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but it rose by just 0.84 per cent in the last parliament (and will rise little more in this one).

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